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Weaving and Embroidery

LE FIGURE NEI TESSUTI PERUGINI
There are no translations available.    "Negli inconfondibili “tessuti...
L'ONORE DELLA TOVAGLIA
There are no translations available. Possedere una tovaglia nel Medioevo era un...
SIMBOLI ANCORA MISTERIOSI NELLE TOVAGLIE PERUGINE
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ROMEYNE ROBERT RANIERI DI SORBELLO
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ALICE HALLGARTEN FRANCHETTI
There are no translations available. La storia di Alice Hallgarten è...
La Rinascita dell'Alto Artigianato del Tessile
There are no translations available. La rinascita arrivò all’alba del...
LE TOVAGLIE PERUGINE RIPRODOTTE IN OPERE D'ARTE
There are no translations available. "... Frammenti o porzioni di antiche...
Ricami: dipinti di ago e filo
There are no translations available. "... Il ricamo è una decorazione, un...
Merletti: pizzi e trine in evidenza
There are no translations available. " Il merletto è una particolare...
Tessuti: intrecci di orditi e trame
There are no translations available. "... Un intreccio di fili perpendicolari....
Un punto per la Madama
There are no translations available. "... Dicono che Caterina de’ Medici...
LE TOVAGLIE PERUGINE
There are no translations available.  "Il punto di forza della grande...
TESSUTI MERLETTI E RICAMI: itinerari dell'alto artigianato artistico con UMBRIA DELLE MIE TRAME
There are no translations available.  L’arte della tessitura, del ricamo e...
The Virtual Museum of Textile Arts
  In 2007, with the creation of a special support facility, the Centre for...
Embroidery and lace ... what a passion!
Embroidery and lace are, from time immemorial, a passion for all women who love...
A SAINT AND HER EMBROIDERY PDF Print E-mail

In Umbria, it is thought that the tradition of embroidery can be traced back to the industriousness of Saint Clare of Assisi (1193/1194-1253). She complemented her intense contemplative life with manual work and, following the example of St. Francis, was influenced by "Lady poverty". Thus, the tradition of weaving and embroidery began in convents, in the sacred vestments and tablecloths with their delicate decorations and mystical inspirations. Saint Jacopa, the founder of the Third Franciscan order, also distinguished herself in the blue rosettes she created and embroidered with care and dedication. Many young women were educated in the convents, even those with no religious vocation, taking their skills in the feminine arts of weaving and embroidery with them, as a bridal dowry, along with a passion for work. From the 15th century, embroidery became the distinctive sign of social status for noble dames and embroidered decorations were used to enrich clothes, upholstery and linen.

Over time, thanks to the contributions of the patrician women, the technique of embroidery used in Assisi became well known, not only in Italy, but also abroad. It was known as the Punto Assisi (Assisi Stitch), establishing itself permanently from the 19th century, thanks to the creation of start-up centres devoted to this work.

For those who want to try this technique, Assisi Stitch is of medium difficulty and requires the use of a thread that is not too thin, with a thickness similar to that of natural linen thread. The colours used in this embroidery are traditionally light blue, blue, dark blue, dark red, bright red, edged with black, brown and rust, which go well with the ecru background. The embroiderer needs to be able make the reverse side of the work identical to the front and, in the various parts of the pattern, must respect a distance of three stitches in length and in width, to ensure perfect regularity in the cross-stitch. The embroidered cloth is typically finished with box stitch and the hem is finished by twisting a thin cord tightly between your thumb and forefinger.


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